C22 Aluminum Toe rail slot dimension needed

Here you can discuss Chrysler Sailing across all makes of Chrysler sailboats.

Moderator: CaptainScott

User avatar
Careyr
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:53 pm
Location: Dubuque, Ia

C22 Aluminum Toe rail slot dimension needed

Postby Careyr » Fri Jun 03, 2016 8:12 pm

I am hoping a C22 owner can provide me with a dimension?
The dimension is needed because I want to utilize the old C22 mast raising system but my TMI22 does not have the aluminum toe rails that are used to fasten the port and starboard bridles. I am going to create my own fastening points for them but would like to duplicate the spread that Chryslers use.
In the instructions it says to fasten each bridle to the toe rail at the 23rd and 32nd slot, counting from the forward end.
I am hoping someone can provide me with the dimension from the center of the 23rd slot to center of the 32nd slot. Or - the overall dimension of (9) slots.
Many thanks in advance!
Carey
1981 TMI 22: "Ms.Chief"

Reality
Posts: 184
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:11 pm
Location: Ellison Bay, WI

Postby Reality » Fri Jun 03, 2016 9:04 pm

the key is that the intersection point for the two cables/ropes coming from the toe rail (or other solid point) intersect at points directly out from (same height and centered on the pivot point at the mast step/hook. My previous owner made a steel U-channel (same width as boat) with wood/carpet pads that sits across the boat directly forward of the mast step with steel eyebolts at same height as mast step. It is fastened to the toe rail using anything (ropes, cargo tie downs). The toe rail slots used doesn't matter for this approach. Again, the key is to provide pivot points out near the toe rails that is the same height and position forward/backward as the step. This allows the line from that pivot point to the mast to be a constant length. I use adjustable motorcycle tie downs for this connection.

User avatar
Careyr
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:53 pm
Location: Dubuque, Ia

Postby Careyr » Sat Jun 04, 2016 12:32 pm

I understand everything that is required and the setup which Chrysler provided still sounds much simpler than all the other rigs I have seen or heard about, so I am duplicating that. While I could simply decide how far apart I would set the bridle ends, some engineer at Chrysler may have had a method to his madness.
Which is why I am requesting that someone might give me the dimension of the 9 slot spread that was prescribed originally. Or just the dimension from center of one slot to center of the next.
A big driver of my choice is that where I live, a sailboat cannot be launched with the mast upright; it has to be done while floating on the water, and I'm making a setup to winch it up while standing in the cockpit. Don't want any more parts on board than two bridles
I appreciate your input - thanks!!
Carey

1981 TMI 22: "Ms.Chief"

User avatar
Papax3
Posts: 62
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:07 pm

Postby Papax3 » Sat Jun 04, 2016 9:56 pm

Wow!
From my experience, hoisting a C22 mast while in the water seems quite dangerous! Is this a law/ ordinance, or lake regulation? I don't even see how you can do it, honestly. First, someone must raise the far end of the mast to hook it into the mast step finger. Unless you have it hinged? Whenever I raise my mast which is nerve wracking due to the weight of this beefy mast, I have a bow rope that goes through the trailering D-ring on the front of the bow (symmetrical lines leading to my 2x4/ winch) and use a 6 foot tall 2x4 system with a hand cranked winch: the 2x4 is lashed towards the bow at a 45 degree angle, with the foot of the 2x4 anchored at the mast step. From the winch, I lash ropes at 8-9 feet from the bottom of the mast fastened securely, attach the winch rope to the lashings, and crank. The mast (can & will) sway greatly... On the water, I could only expect it to be terrifying, dangerous and uncontrolled... Not even sure a hinge will help... Might just tear it right off. I use 2 people, one on each shroud line to stabilize any left to right sway. Also those shroud lines love to get caught on the boat winches, or cabin top.
I HAVE raised the mast single handed, with nothing less than Herculean effort.
Hot tip... Make sure no lines are tangled, or will get caught on anything, then crank like hell to 45 degrees, which is when the shrouds begin to tighten up on there own, and assist you. Piece of cake after you pass that gauntlet.

AGAIN... Raising a C-22 mast can be both terrifying, and quite dangerous!!!
I am very experienced in mast raising now, and it is still ALWAYS intimidating.
It was rarely ever worth it, so I raised my mast and slipped the boat, which is by FAR the best thing to do. ***please be careful*** I can't warn you well enough...

Specific to your question, I would lay lines directly perpendicular to your mast step, on the toe-rail, and haul up from there...

Please be careful, and respect how hard what you are trying to do is.
Having raised C-22 masts a lot, I would FAR sooner break a law, than try to raise a C-22 mast (on the water?). Honestly insane.

Thanx, Bill
We're just about finished with refurbishing our Chrysler 22, she's slipped, and ready for fun!

Lake Quachita, HotSprings Arkansas
Bill Williams

Reality
Posts: 184
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2014 7:11 pm
Location: Ellison Bay, WI

Postby Reality » Sun Jun 05, 2016 6:21 am

totally agree with Bill about stepping mast while floating. My C22 is slipped and any human movement inside boat while at slip moves the mast 1-2 ft side to side. It would be extremely dangerous. I'd opt for breaking the rule.

User avatar
trev
C Shirt
C Shirt
Posts: 160
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 3:17 am
Location: Minnesota
Contact:

Postby trev » Mon Jun 06, 2016 4:17 am

I no longer have my C22 so I can't get you the dimensions but I use to raise and lower the mast in the water every time I trailered it someplace other than my slip. With the boom, bridles, 4 ratchet straps, and a line going to a cockpit winch, the mast always stayed solid and level to the boat no matter what movement there was.
77 C25
Myasis Dragon
http://www.svmyasisdragon.com

User avatar
CaptainScott
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3068
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Washington State
Contact:

Postby CaptainScott » Mon Jun 06, 2016 7:49 am

For those that care,

A properly rigged C22 can easily and safely raise the mast on the trailer or in the water. However the terrifying part might still apply.

Using the bridle system designed by Chrysler works great.

Use extreme care and diligence following the design you can easily use the bridles, 3" pin, and boom along with the main sheet to raise and lower the mast with confidence.

I however very highly recommend practicing on the hard a few times first as the boat will move while in the water. Again with care you do not even need the hinged mast base. It certainly helps but the original hook works fine if not bent.

The key is to keep the mast centered on the boat and that is exactly what the bridle system does.

Many folks here have modified the original system to some degree or another for personal preference and ease of use in specific situations. Myself included.

I have personally owned 4 C22's in my recent past and have helped step or unstep on upwards of 7 different C22s.

So I do not consider myself an expert but do admit a LOT of experience with them.

The biggest bit of advice is simply move slow and with with extreme caution at first. Practice and understand exactly every step.

It is very easy to step the mast on a C22 alone. IF properly practiced and all hardware is in properly good working condition!!

Enjoy!

Scott

User avatar
Careyr
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:53 pm
Location: Dubuque, Ia

Postby Careyr » Mon Jun 06, 2016 11:47 am

Carey

1981 TMI 22: "Ms.Chief"

User avatar
CaptainScott
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3068
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Washington State
Contact:

Postby CaptainScott » Mon Jun 06, 2016 12:58 pm

Hang tight you'll get the dimensions from someone! LOL!
Unfortunately I can not help at the moment!

Here is a link to a post I did many years ago with my first C22 before I cleaned her up.

http://www.captainscottsailing.com/?l=4


See the 4 photos? Click the top right one or "Stepping the Mast"

Each photo in the subsequent page is a hires shot with details.

Hope it helps in any way!

Scott

User avatar
astrorad
Posts: 727
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:09 pm
Location: s.e Wisconsin

Postby astrorad » Mon Jun 06, 2016 7:24 pm

Carey...I will measure mine tomorrow and post the dimension here.
Bill

User avatar
Papax3
Posts: 62
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:07 pm

Postby Papax3 » Mon Jun 06, 2016 9:57 pm

Well!

I too admit to a learning curve from this post... I watched a Catalina 22 raise their mast on the water in a Youtube video (mouth agape!). A good job was done, and I could certainly see the utility in that method now. I also noted he pushed that mast up with one hand... THAT ain't happenin' with a Chrysler!
My previous experiences with sailboats have been limited, but I'm glad for the learning opportunities. Everything I know about raising masts came from my own trial and error, after much research... I honestly couldn't have imagined -prior to this post - that raising a mast on the water was even a possibility. It's great to see such imaginative engineering. My eye quickly saw that preventing sway of any kind was a critical goal.

Cool stuff, and I stand corrected, though I will say.... Don't ever find yourself directly underneath that mast when it's going up! SO BEEFY!

Post that video boss!

Bill
We're just about finished with refurbishing our Chrysler 22, she's slipped, and ready for fun!



Lake Quachita, HotSprings Arkansas

Bill Williams

User avatar
CaptainScott
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 3068
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Washington State
Contact:

Postby CaptainScott » Tue Jun 07, 2016 6:31 am

IS this the video you are asking to be posted?
Not in the water but shows single handed lower and raise!

http://captainscottsailing.com/video/Mast3.avi

Scott

User avatar
astrorad
Posts: 727
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 8:09 pm
Location: s.e Wisconsin

Postby astrorad » Tue Jun 07, 2016 7:52 am

The measurement from the very tip of the front cast aluminum nose piece of the boat, measured along the port toe rail is 102 1/4 Inch to the center of the 23rd slot and 138 inches to the center of the 32nd slot. The center to center distance between the 23rd and 32nd slot is 35 3/4 inch.
The main thing to consider is that if you were to place a horizontal and level straight rod, perpendicular to the boat's axis, through the pivot point of the mast base, the rod should pass through both eyes of the mast raising bridles and remain level.
Bill

User avatar
gregcrawford
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:41 am
Location: Knoxville, TN

Postby gregcrawford » Wed Jun 08, 2016 10:55 am

I have raised and lowered the mast on my C22 in the water on several occasions when I was trying to limit the time spent in the launch ramp parking area. As others have posted, caution must be exercised, and a weather eye directed for incoming boat wakes. Otherwise, it is no more difficult than raising it on the trailer. It is only a matter of seconds for me to move the mast from vertical to horizontal or vice versa using the recommended method and a mast hinge.
Greg Crawford
Knoxville, TN

1976 Chrysler 22 "Blues Image"

http://bluesimage.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Careyr
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:53 pm
Location: Dubuque, Ia

Postby Careyr » Fri Jun 10, 2016 3:54 am

Thanks Astrorad! Now this can be my weekend assembly!

And who knew this would be such a fun topic!! lol

I'll try to post some photos when it's all done. Will be back then.

Happy sailing to all!!!
Carey

1981 TMI 22: "Ms.Chief"


Return to “General Chrysler Sailing Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests