Battery Test Meter Wiring

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panderson1977
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Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:23 am

Battery Test Meter Wiring

Postby panderson1977 » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:01 pm

I recently bought a 1981 TMI 27... Someone had broken into it and removed the electrical panel and I'm in the process of re-wiring the thing. I added some pictures below...

I have already jumpered all the switches together. I'm not sure where to place the hot battery wires with the test switch. Any help would be appreciated!

IMG_2631.jpg
Another angle


IMG_2632.jpg
Front of Panel


IMG_2630.jpg
Back of Panel


Thanks!

Philip

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CaptainScott
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Re: Battery Test Meter Wiring

Postby CaptainScott » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:24 am

Welcome aboard!
IF you have any documents with your boat and are willing to share, I'd be happy to scan them and post them on our Documentation page!
Scott

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EmergencyExit
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Re: Battery Test Meter Wiring

Postby EmergencyExit » Mon Oct 15, 2018 5:31 am

Former broadcast technician here, it is hard to say 'positively' (LOL), but looking at the front and back pics I would say - the red wire that goes to the red test pinhole on the front goes to the center position of the switch, as does that black wire that is connected to the test meter. A wire (fused, please) from each battery would go to opposite sides of the two way switch.

So when the switch is one position, or the other , power from the battery goes to the outside connection, then out the middle (common) one to the meter and to the test pinhole (which I guess is a backup to the meter should it fail, allowing you to use a voltage test meter.

I never see it included in these type circuits, but a large diode to prevent current flowing back to battery A from battery B in case of switch failure isn't a bad idea. Diode points away from each battery to the switch.

And do test this hookup with something like a flashlight battery or a 9 volt battery. If something is wrong that's a lot less power than two big old boat batteries getting mad at you...


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